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Vulvodynia: A Common and Under-Recognized Pain Disorder in Women and Female Adolescents -- Integrating Current Knowledge into Clinical Practice

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The current classification differentiates: (i) vulvar pain due to a known cause vs. (ii) idiopathic chronic vulvar pain, i.e., vulvodynia.

 

  

Pain is first classified by location , i.e., generalized (several areas of the vulva), localized (a specific area of the vulva) or mixed; secondly, it is classified by provocation (provoked, spontaneous or mixed). It is also described by onset, either primary or secondary, and temporal pattern (intermittent, persistent, constant, immediate, or delayed). The two most common forms of vulvodynia are: (i) Generalized Vulvodynia and (ii) Provoked Vestibulodynia (formerly Vulvar Vestibulitis Syndrome).  It should be noted that women may have both a specific disorder (e.g., lichen sclerosus) and vulvodynia.

* See Slide 19 for potential associated factors.

 

  

Since 1975, many terms have been used to describe the two most common vulvodynia subtypes, causing confusion among the medical, scientific and patient communities.  

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